Staff

Patricia Massy

Rafael Zen

Community Engagement Coordinator

Rafael Zen is a visual artist, curator, writer, and educator from Brazil, currently living in the land of the Coast Salish peoples – Squamish, Tsleil-Waututh, and Musqueam (also called Vancouver in its colonial statement). With over 10 years of experience in the cultural segment, he has worked with art collectives, owned a poetic school and book publisher, organized art fairs, and worked as commissioned artist in research projects. Academically, he holds a Master’s degree in Contemporary Artistic Processes and two graduate certificates in “Contemporary Literature” and “Semiotics”. Rafael’s research and curating practices are based on theories of decolonization, anti-capitalism, theories of systems of knowledge used as systems of oppression, contemporary poetic/political processes, and post-structuralism. In 2019, Rafael moved to Vancouver to study artistic practices, and experience new forms of community, and togetherness. He is author of the books: The Swallow Proposition (Poetry,2012); Oral Body (Short Stories, 2015); To The Grandchildren of the Millennium (Poetry, 2019); and Tropical Fevers (Poetry, 2021). In Vancouver, he is a member of the board of directors of the James Black Gallery, and volunteers as a writer for Arts and Culture for The Source Vancouver – Forum of Diversity.


Patricia Massy

Sahba Sadeghian

Volunteer

Sahba Sad (she/they) is an Iranian emerging multidisciplinary artist and writer exploring themes of epic and esoteric through a humorous linguistic lens and processing the findings into ritualistic games displayed in a wide range of mediums including video, performance and installation. Metaphors, double entendres, allegories and synecdoches, taken off the page and translated into elaborate interactive pieces to be physically experienced or surreal videos that invoke a delirious nostalgia. Sahba’s work has hints of Middle East’s recent histories and flavors, full of secret schisms, dolma fillings, underground rebellions, bread as a weapon of anti colonization and forgotten revolutions.